An online article on William Caslon
provides a fascinating portrait of
London’s first major letter founder

The author describes how Caslon began life as a metalworker and engraver of letters on gun barrels before setting up his first letter foundry in 1727, at the age of 35, in London’s Clerkenwell. It was from here he began to sell the types that were later to be known by his name, Caslon. This represented something of a minor revolution in Britain, as the British had previously paid little attention to typefaces and the art of founding type and imported most of the type they needed from abroad.

The Caslon typeface become so popular that Benjamin Franklin actually selected it for the printing of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

To read the original article on William Caslon, click here.

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