Website and magazine on typography launched in Japan

Typophiles, take note of these two exciting developments in Japan!

Typecache.com

Started by four Japanese typophiles a few weeks ago, this English-language website is an online index to type foundries and vendors as well as a showcase of their type collections. The site brings together information on the latest typographic trends throughout the world and is sure to be a useful resource for designers, art directors, and type enthusiasts.

Typography (Graphic-sha Publishing Co., Ltd.)

Launched on May 7, this Japanese-language magazine is enjoying brisk sales. Below is an excerpt from the publisher’s launch announcement:

Typography covers the latest trends in typographic design in Japan and overseas. Published twice a year, the new magazine is dedicated to designers and other people who have keen interest in letters.

‘In its inaugural issue, the magazine showcases a lead article that highlights eye-catching artworks including Comedy Carpet by Gordon Young and Why Not Associates, winner of the Grand Prix at the Tokyo TDC Annual Awards 2012. The feature piece is entitled “Create Your Own Fonts!” and it explains how to design original fonts using such font software as Fontographer and FontLab Studio and sell them in the marketplace. The feature also includes an article by Akira Kobayashi, type director at Linotype GmbH, on type design and an article on the design and production process behind the Stevens Titling font family, which was released in May 2011.’

Interview with designer Sandra Winter

Sandra Winter collaborated with Akira Kobayashi on the design of the new Rounded versions of Avenir Next. We decided to take the opportunity to ask the designer, who was also involved in the DIN Next project, a few questions. You will find the text of the interview, with her fascinating responses and her description of the challenges associated with creating new cuts of an acknowledged classic among fonts, at Linotype.com.

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Linotype.com with new web font features

Yesterday, we released a technical update of Linotype.com that will come very handy for those who want to use Linotype fonts on the web. The standard licencse we sell on Linotype.com doesn’t cover web font use, but with our partner, fonts.com web fonts, we are able to offer Linotype fonts with web font licenses through Fonts.com Web Font Service.

With the new features you can simply browse Linotype.com for inspiration, or search for your favorite typeface. Everything regarding web fonts is branded in a dark blue. We offer three ways to get your web font:

  1. Search for fonts, and click on blue web font button
  2. Browse Linotype.com, select font family, and click on blue Web Font tab next to Details & Background Information
  3. On a font weight detail page, click on blue Web Font Option button

All three options will result in a dialog box opening up, explaining that you will get Linotype web fonts through the web font service provided by Fonts.com. Click on the Get Web Font button and you are taken to the exact match on Fonts.com

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Re:Publica 12 and the Twitter Wall

I just came back home from re:publica 12, a fantastic event bringing together bloggers, self-acclaimed internet rebels, internet marketeers, social web rock stars and designers. In the center of attention at this year’s congress was the analog Twitter wall conceived by precious design studio.

Complete view of the wall

Complete view of the wall

The idea centered at bringing back the Action to digital communication, including hard work and dirty hands. Instead of everyone staring at their screens, captured in computer-based communication, event attendees met at the analog twitter wall, chatted face-to-face, created trans-media experiences by taking photos of printed out tweets and posting them to the Web. The Action team, called Actionists, who had printer’s ink and glue on their hands, plastered tweets onto the wall. A cleverly designed algorithm programmed by precious captured the amount of tweets send per minute, trend topics, and set the top tweets in larger point size and a special fonts chosen from Font.com’s web font portfolio.

For creating a good contrast to re:publica’s CI typeface and to capture the spirit of the event, we choose rounded and serif typefaces, such as the flirty serif typeface Adelle by TypeTogether, the soft rounded version of Memphis, and many more fonts.

The crowd fell in love instantly…

Mixing glue

Preparation....

Picture of the first tweets being plastered on the wall

The first tweets are plastered

Tweet set in Memphis Soft Rounded Bold

Tweet set in Memphis Soft Rounded Bold

Tweet set in Adelle Extra Bold

Tweet set in Adelle Extra Bold

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All the characteristics of a debut work:
Levato by Felix Bonge

At this point, I would like to use the opportunity to draw your attention to a particular typeface. Levato, which has only recently been made available at Linotype.com, is a font family with a large repertoire that was developed on the basis of experiments undertaken by Felix Bonge while participating in a type design course held by Professor Jovica Veljović. After subsequently attending a calligraphy seminar, Bonge completely reworked his concept and achieved this impressive result. Levato is graceful, dynamic and versatile all at the same time. There are five weights with the corresponding genuine italic versions. The suite of glyphs thus covers all potential options: the four character sets, small caps, numerous ligatures, ornamental and swash character variants mean the Levato can be used in headlines, to design magazine layouts and to set continuous text.

For more information on this typeface, ideas for possible applications and the opportunity to purchase the Levato family for your own use, and for reading an interview with Felix Bonge, go to Linotype.com.

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